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20130101
20130131
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WRC (NBC) 9
KNTV (NBC) 8
WBAL (NBC) 6
MSNBCW 3
CNBC 1
MSNBC 1
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English 28
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
NBC
Jan 29, 2013 5:30pm PST
when it comes to sensible eating. our report from our chief science correspondent, robert bazell. >> reporter: when it comes to meals, many of us, like these lunchtime diners in miami, have fairly set schedules. >> i try not to eat dinner past 6:30. >> i will usually work out in the morning, then follow it up with breakfast and lunch at noon. >> reporter: today's study suggests that timing might matter, at least for those who are trying to lose weight. >> this was the first long-term, large-scale study to really show that the timing of meal intake is important in the success of weight loss therapy. >> reporter: the study looked at overweight women who were on the mediterranean diet, high in fish, vegetables and olive oil. the study was done in spain, where lunch is typically the largest meal of the day. all 420 volunteers consumed the same number of calories, those who had lunch before 3 p.m. lost an average of 22 pounds in 20 weeks, five pounds more than those who ate lunch later. the question of timing and weight gain is not new. many experts say that a calorie is a calorie, no
NBC
Jan 4, 2013 5:30pm PST
proven deadly in a handful of cases involving the young. nbc's chief science correspondent robert bazell starts us off tonight with more. >> have you had the flu shot before? >> reporter: packed clinics across the country and the cdcs numbers confirm what was already a bad flu season is getting worse. >> we have seen high fever, severe body aches, nasal congestion, cough. >> reporter: doctors say the major strain circulating this year is making its victims especially sick. and in some cases, it's proven deadly. high school senior max showorth died the day after christmas. >> it started out as the flu and turned into pneumonia and had a staph infection on top of that. so those three things combined took over very quickly. >> reporter: he was one of 18 deaths in children and teens so far this year. such rare cases show just how dangerous flu can be. doctors say the best defense remains the flu vaccine. it's not perfect, but it's the best we've got. and there's still plenty of time and vaccine left. they also urge people who are sick to stay away from work to avoid infecting others. the flu
NBC
Jan 9, 2013 5:30pm PST
already get routinely. our report tonight from our chief science correspondent, robert bazell. >> reporter: the experimental test could revolutionize early detections for two major women's cancers. uterine, which kills 8,000 women a year in this country. and ovarian, which kills 15,000. >> this has the potential to fill in a niche where there is no effective screening test. >> reporter: linda defino has stage 3 ovarian cancer. doctors found it only because she felt a fullness in her abdomen, a symptom women often ignore. >> i started to feel this strange feeling that i just knew wasn't right. >> reporter: she is undergoing 18 weeks of chemotherapy. doctors have long been searching for a test to find ovarian cancer early, when it is far more easily treated. >> when ovarian cancer is found at stage 1, the cure rate is 85 to 90%. >> reporter: to develop the new test, the scientists at johns hopkins started with a familiar pap smear that looks for abnormal cells that become cervical cancer. the pap test has saved millions of lives around the world. the hopkins researchers found that cancerous
NBC
Jan 16, 2013 5:30pm PST
course of action is not getting the flu shot. a story from our chief science correspondent, robert bazell. >> reporter: today's study addresses two of the biggest concerns about the flu vaccine and pregnancy. the conclusion, the vaccine is safe, both for pregnant women and their unborn children. >> by getting an influenza vaccine, mothers are not only protecting themselves, but they're protecting the baby too. >> reporter: valerie isabelle was born quite healthy on tuesday. her mother, layla, got a flu shot back in october. >> i got it before the flu season started, when i was a little shy of seven months. >> reporter: this study, the largest to date, looked at more than 117,000 pregnancies in norway, which has free health care and keeps excellent medical records. the study found that women who contracted the flu while pregnant had almost twice the chance of a miscarriage. but even as they got the flu, after getting vaccinated, the chance of miscarriage still went down. and most important, it showed the flu shot itself did not increase the chance of miscarriage or put the baby at risk. fo
NBC
Jan 17, 2013 5:30pm PST
abuse. >> reporter: and that could impact the gains we are seeing now. robert bazell, nbc news, new york. >>> now to the bizarre story that broke nationwide last night involving sports and truth and lies and the internet age. at the center of this is a notre dame football player named manti te'o, a star linebacker, runner up for the heisman and a big part of his dramatic back story was the death of his girlfriend of leukemia until this report surfaced that there was no girlfriend. she was an internet invention. te'o says he's the victim of a hoax. notre dame is standing behind him. there are still a whole lot of questions here. nbc's john yang is with us from south bend, indiana tonight. john, good evening. >> reporter: good evening, brian. today manti te'o was out of sight, he's at a florida sports center, preparing for what he hopes is an nfl career. that as the story that is the centerpiece of his fairy tale final college year has collapsed around him. >> manti te'o! >> reporter: manti te'o was a college football hero, not just to the home crowd here at notre dame, but to fans across
NBC
Jan 2, 2013 4:30am EST
and can be very dangerous. nbc's chief medical correspondent robert bazell with more. >> reporter: the type of blood clot that struck mrs. clinton is rare. the clot is on the surface of the vein. the vein carries blood to the heart and lungs. the big danger is that the clot could grow larger causing blood to block up in the brain. that could cause a stroke. doctors prevent that with blood thinners. once the clot is discovered, doctors say mrs. clinton would have gotten an i.v. drip with a blood thinner. the entire time, the doctors would be watching her closely, usually in the icu. you're observing the patient to make sure that they're stable. you want to make sure that they're not developing new symptoms. >> reporter: concussions have gotten attention lately as sports injuries among children but mrs. clinton's case say reminder that they can happen to anyone. whether the danger is a rare blood clot near the brain or bleeding inside the brain, anyone who gets a concussion should seek immediate care if they have any of these symptoms, bad headaches, bad speech. mrs. clinton reporte
NBC
Jan 19, 2013 5:30pm PST
get the story tonight from nbc's chief science correspondent robert bazell. >> reporter: jake is a perfectly normal 16 years old but when he was 2 years old, shown on in these videotapes, he was diagnosed with severe autism, the widespread disorder that affects a child's ability to have social interactions. >> he stopped relating. he wasn't interested in other kids, and by his second birthday he stopped speaking entirely. >> reporter: after two years of intensive therapy 40 hours a week, he was declared free of autism, and he remains so to this day. >> when i look at the videos when i'm 2 years old, i cannot believe that at one point in my life that was me. >> reporter: new research from the university of connecticut closely studying 34 such cases including jake includes the outcome is real. therapy does bring a cure in some cases, and it is often with kids who were severely autistic. >> they had very little language when they were 2 and 3 years old, and they were really, most of them classically autistic. >> reporter: but the good news comes with caveats. researchers caution
NBC
Jan 1, 2013 6:30pm EST
. we asked robert bazell to take a look at how blood clots are treated and injuries. >> reporter: the type of blood clot that struck mrs. clinton is potentially dangerous but it is not a typical complication of a concussion. >> patients who have a concussion, very rarely have this type of injury. this would be similar to the clot that she had. >> reporter: it's more common that a concussion would cause bleeding inside the brain. but doctors say a brain scan looking for that problem would find a clot. mrs. clinton's clotd formed in a vein on the surface of the brain. it could grow larger causing blood to back up into the brain. that could cause a stroke. doctors prevent that with blood thinners which slowly dissolve the clot. once the clot was discovered, doctors say mrs. clinton would have gotten an iv drip with a strong blood thinner, replaced a few days later with a less powerful thinner in pill form. the entire time, doctors would be watching her closely, usually in the icu. >> you're observing the patient to make sure that they're stable. you want to make sure that they're no
NBC
Jan 17, 2013 6:30pm EST
correspondent, robert bazell. >> reporter: the report out today illustrates huge strides in the fight against cancer which kills one in four americans. the death rate down more than 20% in the last two decades is attributed to improved survival from the biggest killers, lung and colon cancer, for both men and women. breast cancer and women and prostate cancer. >> the public should be ecstatic we are seeing these kind of reductions but they need to realize the battle hasn't been one. >> reporter: experts emphasize the kind of death rate is not due to the expensive new drugs we hear about. instead they point to people smoking less and early detection, especially for breast and colon cancer. still, this year, an estimated 1.6 million americans will be diagnosed with cancer, and more than 580,000 will die from it. according to the report, the death rate for melanoma, often caused by sun exposure, is rising. and there is major concern about obesity, which affects many cancers, including liver, breast and colorectal cancer. >> over the next 10 to 15 years, it's indeed possible that the obesity epid
NBC
Jan 9, 2013 5:00pm PST
depend on it. chief science correspondent, robert bazell. >> we have more ahead on nbc bay area, a new screening test that will detect one of the hardest to detect cancers in women. >> and at 6:00, a man in prison for more than a decade after stealing $100,000 worth of merchandise from a store, he is now free and how he is making the most of his second chance. >> remember to layer. see you at 6:00. >> it will be cold. >>> on our broadcast tonight, in the fight. one american city has now declared a full-on flu emergency as deaths from the illness increase and hospitals try to keep up. early detection. big new hope tonight in the fight against ovarian cancer. the deadliest form for women. there has been a big development. >>> rules of the road. how far can police officers go when they pull you over? the story could have a big impact for allf us on the road. >>> and fallen stars. lance armstrong set to open up to oprah as the hall of fame door is shut on some baseball greats tainted by the steroid controversy. "nightly news" begins now. >>> from nbc news world headquarters in new york, th
MSNBC
Jan 2, 2013 2:00am PST
, there's no neurological damage. this type of blood clot is rare and can be very dangerous. robert bazell with more including important warning signs you need to know. >> reporter: the type of blood clot that struck mrs. clientntos potentially dangerous. it formed in a vein on the surface of the brain. the vein carries blood to the heart and lungs. the big danger is that the clot could grow larger, causing blood to back up into the brain causing a stroke. doctors prevent that with blood thinners that slowly dissolve the clock. once the clot was discovered, mrs. clinton would have gotten an iv drip with a blood thinner replaced a few days later with a pill form. the entire time doctors would be watching her closely, usually in the icu. >> you're answering the patient to make sure they're stable. >> reporter: concussions have gotten attention as sports injuries among children, but mrs. clinton's case is a reminder they can happen to anyone. whether the danger is a rare blood clot near the brain or bleeding inside the brain, anyone suffering a concussion should seek immediate medical care da
NBC
Jan 1, 2013 7:00am EST
science correspondent robert bazell is at columbia university hospital. >> reporter: good morning, andrea. she has a blood clot just below her ear on a blood vessel that drains blood from the brain but critically, it's not in the brain itself, which makes a difference in the prognosis. it's still a dangerous situation. you can see where the red dot there is on the diagram. it's being dissolved with blood thinners and over a period of days and all indications are that she will make a complete recovery. this is a dangerous situation, but she's going to be fine. andrea? >> good news. happy new year to you as well. thank you, robert. >>> now to the weather. scattered showers and thunderstorms are likely today throughout the southeast and gulf coast. some areas may receive over an inch of rain. isolated snow showers through the ohio valley and into the virginias with one to three inches of snow. higher amounts of elevations. much of the country remains quite chilly with temperatures below average and partly cloudy conditions. that's a look at the national weather. i'll have your local forecast
NBC
Dec 31, 2012 7:00pm EST
science correspondent robert bazell joins me now. bob, walk us through exactly what happened with this blood clot and how dangerous is it? >> reporter: this is a blood clot right behind the ear, right there. in a vein that's very close to the brain. you can see it on a red dot there, where there's a blockage, in a vein that drains blood from the brain. this is not common and not usually the result of a concussion. typically people get clots on the brain itself, and those can't be treated with anti coagulants, but this can be safely cleared away with drugs. the big danger is, if it weren't dissolved, it could grow and cause a stroke. according to her doctors, she has no evidence of the neurological damage that would have resulted from a stroke. >> the doctors are saying she'll recover completely. any idea how long she might be in the hospital? >> reporter: well, kate, experts who are not involved tell me if the treatment is successful, the patient often leaves the hospital within a few days. typically patients need to take it easy for several weeks. but doctors say there is no
MSNBC
Jan 10, 2013 8:00am PST
in boston as we reported yesterday they declared a public health emergency there. robert bazell joins me more. the cdc is expected to come out with new numbers on this tomorrow. how bad is it expected to be with the new revelation of numbers? >> we have to put this in perspective. don't forget, we have the spine flu in 2009, and 2010, 289 children in total died. the cdc doesn't take track of adults. it would be possible to do that. in addition to the flu, there's a couple other things going on. there's a lot of other viruses circulated this time of year. so everything that is flooding emergency rooms is not just flu. it's also other respiratory diseases. one called norovirus which causes a lot of gastrointestinal problems. it's the flu season will not be as bad as 2003, 2004. will it peak in the next few weeks, but right now, it's pretty bad. >> for those who may have not gotten their flu shot yet, and they may be thinking, well, there's not much longer to go, i can stick it out. would your advice and the doctors say get it no matter? >> yes, unless you're allergic to eggs or something.
CNBC
Jan 7, 2013 4:00pm EST
want to get more on this flu season. robert bazell is with me now with more details. whap can you tell us? >> i can tell you it's a bad flu season. app lot of people are going to get sick. some of them are going to die. a very small percentage. and as the ceo of sanofi said, get your flu shot. what else do you want me to tell you, maria? >> well, i guess, does a flu shot really do it? i mean, a lot of people get the and then they get the flu. >> that's an important point. the flu shot is not a guarantee you won't get the flu. the flu sot is not as good as everybody would like it to be. everybody who's in medicine. it's better than nothing. it's the best we've got. and it does two things. it reduces your chances of getting the flu. and it reduces your chances of getting seriously ill if you do get the flu. and a third thing, it reduces the chance of you spreading the flu to other people around you even if you get it. the flu shot does not give you the flu. but there's a critical thing that comes up in terms of the rnd for industry. which is that whether industry is interested in making
MSNBC
Jan 1, 2013 6:00am PST
science and health correspondent robert bazell is here with more on her condition. and when they put a statement out yesterday, you know, they said she was in good spirits, that she was communicating well with her doctors, no sign of a stroke. it all seemed to be very positive, but what are the concerns right now? >> well, the concerns are that the clot doesn't get completely dissolved. there is no indication that that's not happening. what she had was a consequence of a concussion that she got from a fall a few weeks ago. you can see on the graphic there where the spot of the blockage is. this is a vein that drains blood from the brain into the rest of the body. and if the clot is not taken care of, the danger is that that red spot can grow and go back into the brain and cause some kind of stroke or ocollusion of the circulation to the brain. that did not happen. they say they've done extensive neurological tests on her and these tests all indicate that she's perfectly in good shape. she can speak well, she can move well, all these things that are so critical and that somebody in th
NBC
Jan 5, 2013 5:00am PST
and has proven deadly in a number of cases including the young. more from robert bazell. >>> you've had the flu shot before? >> yes. >> reporter: packed clinics across the country and the cdc's numbers confirm that what was already a bad flu season is quickly getting worse. >> we're seeing people with really high fever, severe body aches, nasal congestion, cough. >> reporter: doctors say the major strain circulating is making its victims especially sick. in some cases, it's proven deadly. high school senior max shalwart died the day after christmas. >> it started as flu, turned into pneumonia, and he had a staph infection on top of that. the three things took over quickly. >> reporter: he was one of 18 deaths in children and teenager this year. doctors say the best defense remains the flu vaccine. it's not perfect, but it's the best we've got. and there's time and vaccine left. they urge people who are sick to stay away from work to avoid infecting others. the flu virus is often transmitted with coughs and sneezes, but it can live on all the surfaces we touch. think how many there are f
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)